Jacquard Emerald Powdered Dye Trial

I’ve been using the liquid Jacquard dyes for several years and decided to check out the cost effectiveness of their powdered dyes.

 

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One and a half teaspoons of Jacquard Emerald dye powder yielded one pound of dyed roving (deep emerald); 5 ounces of 50/50 Suffolk/Corriedale yarn (light jade), and 4 ounces of mystery roving (turquoise)!!!

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The above photo is the yarn in an aluminum pot on my stove top. I prefer to use aluminum because of the nice color splits I get out of it.

 

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The result of this experiment is that I’m not going back to liquid dyes, especially now that I learned I can mix my own. A friend also suggested I try out ProChem dyes as well, so that will have to be a future blog post.

Bored?? Get something and dye it! 

 

Frozen Tundra Fibers Has Outlasted Its Impetuous Pompacity?

On February 1, 2020, Frozen Tundra Fibers became everything I no longer wanted. The name was impetuous and pompass when I named it over 15 years ago and I loved it. I don’t love it any more.

I’ve learned through introspection and reflection that what it’s always been is an amazing odyssey traveling through all of the different fibers I’ve worked with over the years; learning how to to dye with natural dyed and commercial dyed (which I’m still learning and experimenting with);  the wonderful sheep farmers I’ve met during that time, some of which have become family, and some dear friends; the many farms I’ve visited and still do when I get out there; and the processes I’ve learned and the new ones I’m learning.

It’s moving forward and I decided I want to move forward with it.

Without further ado or pompacity (hehe), I hereby announce the rebranding of Frozen Tundra Fibers. The new name as of February 1, 2020 is Mrs D’s Fiber Odyssey!!!

https://www.etsy.com/shop/MrsDsFiberOdyssey  formerly https://www.etsy.com/shop/FrozenTundraFibers

Get your yarn on!

A Knitting Graph Study Using the Same Chart for Two Different Dishcloths!

I’m an avid knitter and I’m an avid reader. I love books and all of the fiber arts, however when it comes to weaving and knitting I prefer to work from charts. I find that charts are easier to process. A good chart is worth a thousand words, especially for knitting and weaving (crocheting, too).

I love Interweave Press Piecework magazine. The Jan/Feb 2010 issue has an interesting chart called, Diamond Basketweave, in the article, A New Pattern Stitch from a Knitting Legend, by Barbara G. Walker. I pulled out two skeins of cotton yarn and got to work.

The chart is 32 stitches both ways. I cast on 52 stitches on size 5 straight needles and knit 5 rows of garter stitch and 5 rows of stockinette stitch. I slipped the first stitch of each row throughout the whole dishcloth. Row 11 began with a slipped stitch, knit 4, knit 6 (purl on wrong side), then worked the pattern, as charted, two times. I knit 5 rows (purl on wrong side) opposite of the top, and finished with with 5 rows of garter stitch before binding off.

I knit the second dishcloth with the same beginning and ending, with a twist: I turned the chart sideways and got a neater basketweave that shows up better on the wrong side.

The orange dishcloth was knit first. The motif shows best on the right side. The real one was knit with the graph sideways and shows best on the wrong side.

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Get busy creating!!!

In which I trim my own bonnet.

*(I’m reblogging the following post from opusanglicanum because I also love hats and I love how she remade this hat with her own card woven band. TLD)

Those of you who’ve met me will know I like hats, because it’s kind of obvious. I’ve always been this way. When my mum was marrying my stepdad she asked what I wanted to wear, and…

Source: In which I trim my own bonnet.